Coquille River Light

We visited three different lighthouses along the Oregon coast, and I would be hard-pressed to pick a favorite.  However, the image of the Coquille River Light was one of my favorites from the entire trip.  I like the dramatic clouds in the background and the 'misty' foreground with the lichen-covered boulders.  It's sometimes difficult to pick a favorite, as each photo has something unique.  Add to that the emotional attachment of the 'place' and the experience of being there to take in the sights, sounds, and smells that surrounded the process of making the image.  This was a gray, cloudy, and kind of windy day.  The Coquille River pounded against the rocks on shore. Occasionally, a gust of wind would carry with it a hint of sand to brush against the face and the cool, salty smell of the Pacific.  As photographers, we naturally wanted to get the best perspectives to capture this scene, which for some meant daring the splashing water and slippery rocks along the river's edge.    

So you see, a photograph is so much more than just a few million pixels with varying brightness and color values that compose a representative image of a scene.  It is a collection of moments, an amalgamation of experiences that filled the senses and enthralled the imagination.  It is within those moments that we seek the inspiration to best capture a split second of time; to create an image that captivates and also invokes some of the emotion that we felt while standing there.  I hope that my images accomplish this to at least some degree.     

Coquille River Light

The Coquille River Light, located near Bandon, Oregon, was first lit on February 29, 1896.  The light helped to guide the way past the shifting sandbars of the Coquille River and into the harbor at Bandon.  The lighthouse was decommissioned in 1939, giving way to automation.  The light deteriorated and was subjected to vandalism following its deactivation.  The attached living quarters, as well as several outbuildings, fell into such disrepair that they eventually had to be removed.  Recent renovations have restored this historical landmark to its present condition and it is currently maintained by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.  Enjoy a few more images from the day below, and thanks for stopping by!