Manhattan

A Rainy Day in the Neighborhoods

After leaving the East Village, our path lead us through the neighborhoods of Little Italy and Chinatown.  It was a rainy day, so not great for being out for a walk in the city or for having the cameras out.  We still had a great time and made the most of it.  

Although once known for its large population of Italian-Americans, Little Italy is now much smaller and consists of only a few Italian stores and restaurants.  In the early 1900s, at its peak, there were nearly 10,000 Italians in the community.  By the year 2000, only about 1,200 residents claiming Italian ancestry remained.  The neighborhood has shrunk considerably, with many shops and restaurants closing in recent years.  From experience, it sure didn't seem like we were in this neighborhood for long.  As I look back now, there really aren't any photos in my library that really show this neighborhood very well.  

Chinatown, just south of Little Italy, is a different story.  There was no doubt when we entered this neighborhood, as the markets and people were a definite indicator.  The streets were abuzz with the hustle and bustle of people coming and going in every direction.  Many were likely tourists, but there were many shopkeepers and others who seemed to be residents.  This neighborhood is the largest enclave of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere, with an estimated population of 90,000 to 100,000.  It is also one of the oldest.  The Lower Manhattan Chinatown is just one of twelve Chinatown neighborhoods in the New York metropolitan area, containing the largest ethnic Chinese population outside of Asia.  

Chinatown is an interesting place, with many shops and markets selling a variety of goods, and many interesting people.  Below are just a sampling of images showing the neighborhood. 

Church of the Transfiguration, Chinatown, New York

The Flatiron Building

Let's see....where did I leave off.  Last month, before beginning my postings about my top ten images for 2016, I had been sharing some of my adventures from my trip to New York.  It's time to get back on track and share some more.  

There are numerous iconic buildings in New York City.  We visited a few of them when I was there back in October.  The Flatiron Building, located at 175 Fifth Avenue, is one such building.  The building was completed in 1902 and at the time, was one of the tallest buildings in the city.  The name of the wedge-shaped building is derived from its resemblance to a cast-iron clothes iron.  

The Flatiron Building was designated a New York City landmark in 1966; added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979; and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1989.  

Flatiron Building

We started this day out like pretty much every other day.  After a quick breakfast in a nearby cafe, we were on our way to explore the city.  I think I mentioned it before, but the best way to really explore is to just hit the streets and walk.  It may take more time, but there is so much to see that would be missed if riding in a cab, a bus, or on the subway.  

The start of another work day in the Big Apple

Photographing the Flatiron Building (or any building for that matter) wasn't the easiest thing to do.  I've never done much architectural photography, but wanted to show the setting for the building.  It sure is unique and almost looks out of place.  

Along the way and after leaving the Flatiron Building, we continued on a path that led into the East Village for lunch, then on through Little Italy, Chinatown, and eventually the 9/11 Memorial and One World Trade Center.  Like I said, we did a lot of walking.  I won't cover all of those areas in this post, but will show a few images of the interesting sites along the way.  If you look closely, you'll even see some of the wildlife that we enjoyed on this day in one of the city's many parks.  

Live Bait (among other things)

We even went by B&H (the other one)

Not sure who this fellow was, but didn't look like one to be trifled with.